Abstract Submission Categories

 

Please see the abstract submission guidelines for details on submitting your abstract. 

Advanced Materials as Biosensors
Advanced Materials as Biosensors
The interface of biomaterials and biological fluids offers a unique opportunity for binding, detecting, and reporting the presence of analytes. Recent studies have shown that, by tuning the composition of materials and/or coupling recognitive molecules, it is possible to generate materials with selective affinity for biological analytes. Critical biomedical problems related to sensing are being solved at the intersection of biomaterials and other disciplines - such as textiles, nanomaterials, bioinformatics, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology.
This session will highlight recent advancements in biomaterials as components of biosensors. Abstracts can relate to the detection of a range of biological analytes (i.e. small molecules, proteins, nucleic acids, viruses, or cells). Both fundamental studies related to the material-analyte interface, as well as translational studies on new biosensors, are encouraged. Studies detailing the development of biomaterial biosensors or other technologies for use in low-resource settings are welcome.

Antigen-delivery strategies for inducing immune tolerance
Antigen-delivery strategies for inducing immune tolerance
The development of safe and effective antigen-specific therapies is needed to treat patients with diseases such as autoimmune diseases, allergies and drug hypersensitivities. This rapid-fire session will focus on strategies to deliver antigen for the induction of prophylactic or therapeutic tolerance in these various settings. Approaches including but not limited to antigen-encoding DNA vaccines, peptide or whole antigen delivery, antigen-loaded targeting antibodies, epitopes loaded into relevant carriers, antigen co-delivery with immunomodulators, antigen glycosylation for APC targeting, autoantigen loaded tolerogenic APC vaccines, targeting of specific sites such as the liver, lymphatics or mucosa will be considered.

Antimicrobial drug delivery in infectious diseases
Antimicrobial drug delivery in infectious diseases
Antimicrobials, including antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal drugs, have achieved great success in modern medicine. However, it is still facing critical challenges especially due to drug resistance.  Novel drug delivery approaches have been applied to improve the efficacy and reduce systemic exposure to address some of those issues. In this session, the topic will include but not limited to: co-delivery of synergistic antimicrobial combinations, drug delivery to infected tissue for localization, cellular targeted microbial drug delivery, antimicrobial biomateirials, and sustained drug release for long-acting antimicrobials. 

Bioelectronic Devices & Conducting Biomaterials
Bioelectronic Devices & Conducting BiomaterialsBioelectronics, electronics designed to interface with biology in vitro and in vivo, are an important class of biomaterials that are gaining significant interest. Bioelectronic devices include: (i) wearable sensors for health monitoring, (ii) in vitro diagnostics and biosensors that provide an electrical signal output proportional to an analyte, (iii) implantable devices (e.g. pacemakers, blood glucose monitoring, drug delivery, optoelectronics), (iv) electrophysiology (ECG, EMG, EEG) and (v) electrical stimulation of cells or tissues for tissue engineering, enhanced regeneration and therapeutic intervention. This symposium will highlight recent efforts in bioelectronic devices and electronically & ionically conducting biomaterials as well as their in vitro and in vivo application. Presentations will also cover material and fabrication advances for improved properties such as size, softness, flexibility, degradability, biocompatibility, and biointegration.

Biofunctional Dental Materials for Advancing Oral Health
Biofunctional Dental Materials for Advancing Oral Health
New generation of advanced dental materials is being developed to impart biointeraction and bioactivity with its surrounding environment. Anti-biofilm biomaterials assist with the prevention and re-infection of oral diseases. Bioactive biomaterials, with ion releasing capabilities, may stimulate the repair/growth of oral hard tissues. These biofunctionalities could significantly benefit clinical outcomes and tooth preservation. This session will describe the latest research in the development of biofunctional biomaterials used in different dental applications including antimicrobial, antifungal, anti-enzymatic, tissue regeneration, self-healing, stimuli-responsive biomaterials and drug delivery platforms. 

BioInterfaces SIG
BioInterfaces SIG
T
he BioInterfaces Special Interest Group seeks to promote a better understanding of cell and protein interactions with biomaterial interfaces. To achieve these goals, the group organizes activities related to the evaluation of existing materials and the design of new materials to produce targeted responses by proteins and cells. Some of the topics related to proteins include: 1) relating surface chemistry to protein adsorption or specific binding and 2) studying the activation or inactivation of protein function at interfaces, including complement activation. Cell topics include: 1) the response of cells to differing chemistries and microstructures (roughness or porosity), 2) the evaluation of multiple cell and tissue response parameters (attachment, growth, migration, differentiation, inflammation, fibrosis), 3) the role of surface receptors in cell responses, and 4) all relevant cell types including bacteria. The group organizes workshops, symposia, and sessions at the annual meeting.

Biomaterial advances for maternal and fetal health
Biomaterial advances for maternal and fetal health
Maternal and fetal health are closely linked to long term health. Conditions such as preeclampsia can increase both a mother and child's risk for health complications including heart disease and high blood pressure later in life. Exposure to various environmental toxicants have been linked to increased risk of pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes and miscarriage. Biomaterials can play an important role in understanding and promoting maternal and fetal health. These materials can be used to achieve new models, treatments, and diagnostics for prenatal and maternal healthcare. This session will cover advances in this field, including, but not limited to, organ-on-a-chip approaches to drug toxicity screening, development of models of the maternal-fetal interface, treatments for pregnancy complication (e.g., preterm birth, preeclampsia, etc.), placental membranes, biomechanics during pregnancy, new fertility treatments, and fetal cell isolation.

Biomaterial-based strategies for drug delivery across CNS barriers
Biomaterial-based strategies for drug delivery across CNS barriers
Macromolecule transport to/from the central nervous system (CNS) is regulated by a number of physiological barriers that present a challenge for drug and therapeutic delivery. This session will focus on cutting edge research in biomaterial-based strategies to evade such barriers for drug/therapeutic delivery ranging from fundamental material development through pre-clinical studies.

Biomaterial-Tissue Interaction SIG
Biomaterial-Tissue Interaction SIG
Events that follow binding of the first host ion to an implant’s surface are dictated by reactions not well understood for any biomaterial or device. Understanding these events is the purpose of the Biomaterial-Tissue Interaction Special Interest Group. Only through such understanding can one definitively answer such questions as: “Why did it fail?” and “What led to its success that we can apply to future devices?” These answers will come from such fields as physiology, immunology, pathology, biomechanics and material science. They will apply to the subjects of every other SIG in the Society.  All those interested in the mechanisms of host-implant interaction are welcome to join BTI's quest.

Biomaterials Education
Biomaterials Education SIG
The Biomaterials Education SIG members' mission is to affect quality of teaching and learning through the discussion, generation and implementation of innovative ideas. Through this, they seek to advance the interests and goals of the biomaterials community by attempting to bridge the gap between classroom theory and clinical application. As the field of biomaterials rapidly evolves, so must biomaterials education. The Biomaterials Education Special Interest Group is dedicated to the belief that all members of the biomaterials community should be provided with high quality educational opportunities in a stimulating environment.

Biomaterials for Cardiovascular Regeneration
Biomaterials for Cardiovascular Regeneration
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major medical problem around the globe. To develop proper treatment strategies for CVD, we must overcome the limitations associated with the i) inability to vascularize synthetic tissues, ii) lack of a renewable cell source, iii), lack of biomaterials that have similar features to the native cardiovascular tissues, and iv) lack of tissue models that can recapitulate the events that occur during cardiovascular healing. In this session, we will include topics ranging from strategies of vascularization of engineered constructs to delivery of small molecules and/or cells, and different fabrication methods for generation of 3D scaffolds. Furthermore, the session will provide examples of using engineered heart tissues to test drugs and therapeutic targets for cardiovascular regeneration. Finally, we will also cover examples for translation of cardiovascular tissue engineering approaches from bench to bedside care.
 

Biomaterials for detection and treatment of microbial infections
Biomaterials for detection and treatment of microbial infections
Microbial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat. Antimicrobial resistance has rendered many of our antimicrobial therapeutics ineffective, leading to a significant health and economic burden. Compounding this issue is a lack of development of new antimicrobial drug classes limiting the pipeline of available therapeutics. Advances in biomaterials for detection and therapy have the potential to improve outcomes for patients suffering from these infections, including bacterial, fungal, viral, and biofilm-associated infections. Innovations in biomaterials are arguably needed now more than ever in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. This session will cover advances in biomaterials for the treatment and detection of microbial infections. Strategies discussed may include development of bacterial biosensors, antimicrobial coatings, nano- and micro-particle drug carriers, hydrogels, gene therapy approaches, etc.

Biomaterials for High-Throughput and Microfluidics-Based Screening Applications
Biomaterials for High-Throughput and Microfluidics-Based Screening Applications
Miniaturization of platforms for 3D culture of organoids or other mini-tissues can require unique biomaterial solutions, both for the supportive 3D matrix, and for the platform itself. Biomaterial modifications may be instrumental in enabling multicellular co-culture within a matrix, preventing  cell attachment to the platform, or reducing undesired drug adsorption to either element. This session will focus on specific adaptations for miniaturized cell cultures, employing microfluidics or other high-throughput features, for assaying cell interactions related to pathway analyses or screens for therapeutics.

Biomaterials for Image-guided therapy
Biomaterials for Image-guided therapy
Molecular imaging is envisioned to play a pivotal role in the early diagnosis and simultaneous treatment of diseases. Recent advances in the imageable nano/ biomaterials as well as imaging modalities have made the preemptive treatment of the diseases and image guided surgery a reality. The integration of diagnosis and therapy in tandem, known as 'theranostic', can tackle the conundrum of debilitating diseases such as cancer and infectious diseases. In this session, we will cover emerging approaches to engineer nano/ biomaterials for imaging application. This multidisciplinary approach entails a unique coalition between chemists, materials engineer, bioengineers, electrical engineers, and data scientists. The session will emphasize the role of imageable small molecules, engineered biological entities (e.g. proteins), nanoparticles, and hydrogels in cutting-edge imaging methods namely computed tomography, spectral photon counting CT, PET/SPECT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging (fluorescent, bioluminescent, NIR II imaging), photoacoustic imaging, ultrasound, Raman and SERS chemical imaging. These modalities will make the multiscale monitoring of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, immunotherapy, implant engraftment, stem cell delivery and infectious diseases such as SARS-COV-2 feasible.

Biomaterials for Organoids
Biomaterials for Organoids
Three-dimensional ex vivo organoid cultures using biomaterial-based assembly and self-assembly have been shown to resemble and recapitulate most of the functionality of diverse multicellular tissues and organs, such as the gut, brain, liver, kidney, and lung. Organoids bridge a gap in existing model systems by providing a more stable system amenable to extended cultivation and manipulation, while being more representative of in vivo physiology. For years, bioengineers have aspired to construct biological systems and manipulate the system in a highly controlled manner with biomaterials. Discovery of new substrates, pathways and growth factors is expected to contribute significantly to clinical protocols and ameliorate concerns related to potential ethical issues. This new "Biomaterials for Organoids" Session will cover the most recent advancements of biomaterial mediated organoid technologies in regenerative medicine, cancer therapy, drug testing, environmental control and monitoring, adaptive sensing, CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, as well as the large-scale cell manufacturing and reproducible applications of organoids transplantation.
 

Biomaterials for Regenerative Engineering
Biomaterials for Regenerative Engineering

Due to disease, degeneration, or trauma, there is a tremendous need to repair damaged tissues and organs. Although surgical replacement can be performed to address this issue, the insufficient number of donors greatly limits the applicability of this approach. Therefore, it is essential to develop engineered multifunctional biomaterials to promote tissue regeneration. Regenerative engineering combines biomaterial-based approaches with stem cell therapies and developmental biology to regenerate or repair tissues and organs. This symposium will cover tunable biocompatible materials such as hydrogels, fibers, proteins, carbohydrates, nano/micro-porous scaffolds, and metals, to modulate cellular microenvironments. The biomaterials that can direct cell fate and promote differentiation will also be highlighted by this session. Moreover, the biomaterials that can facilitate drug delivery and immunomodulation will be covered through oral and poster presentations. Furthermore, we will include discussions for the development and commercialization of various medical devices such as blood contacting implants, prostheses, and pacemakers in the session. In addition to engineering approaches, we will provide discussions on clinical translation of biomaterial-based strategies. We will also include topics that are relevant to the rapidly changing circumstances associated with the Novel Coronavirus to improve patient putcomes. We expect that our interdisciplinary session including material science, chemistry, biology, engineering, and medicine will be of great significance to the clinicians, industry members and professors in academia.

Biomaterials for regulating immune responses
Biomaterials for regulating immune responses​
This session will focus on development of synthetic or natural biomaterials to regulate immune functions or modulate the metabolism of immune cells. For conditions such as autoimmune diseases, allergies, graft-versus-host disease, and hypersensitivity to biological drugs, biomaterials may offer the potential to induce antigen-specific immune tolerance through novel antigen delivery approaches, or precisely induce local immune suppression by scaffold or targeted drug delivery. Developing biomaterials that modulate the metabolism of immune cells is also an emerging field, because of the ability to selectively regulate immune responses, and provide insight into basic immune regulatory mechanisms. 

Biomaterials for Women's Health
Biomaterials for Women's Health *BTI*
The field of biomaterials is constantly advancing in an effort to provide improved patient outcomes.  Some biomaterial applications are specific to women's health, such as treatments related to childbirth or pregnancy, pelvic organ prolapse, female stress urinary incontinence, breast augmentation or breast reconstruction following mastopexy.  This session will cover current biomaterial topics that address issues related specifically to women's health or applications that are related to surgical procedures aimed at treating the female anatomy.

Biomaterials & Medical Products Commercialization
Biomaterials & Medical Products Commercialization SIG
B&MPC SIG members exchange ideas and experiences about the commercialization of medical products dependent upon biomaterials for utility and efficacy.  Society for Biomaterials members, ranging from students to veterans in the field, will find an open forum to explore issues facing commercial biomaterials, such as regulations, patents, litigation, reimbursement for the resultant medical device, manufacturing and distribution; as well as perceptions of safety and patient benefits.  Translation from development to marketing of safe and innovative medical products is challenged by the inconsistent availability of biomaterials in the shadow of these concerns, and a politically lively healthcare arena.  Join the Biomaterials and Medical Products Commercialization SIG to enhance your knowledge and coping skills in the dynamic healthcare community.

Biomaterials Systems and Devices for Hemostasis, Resuscitation and Wound Care
Biomaterials Systems and Devices for Hemostasis, Resuscitation and Wound Care

Hemorrhage control, hemodynamic resuscitation and spatio-temporal wound care via passive and/or bioactive mechanisms are important application areas of biomaterials-based technologies and includes external, intracavitary, and intravascular hemostats, nanoparticle/microparticle systems, artificial blood surrogates, dressings, powders, foams, fibers and gels. The goal of this session is to highlight recent advances in such biomaterials technologies that focus on hemostasis/thrombosis, hemodynamic stabilization, tissue oxygenation and wound healing. The proposed session will invite presentations from researchers in this field that discuss design of the biomaterials systems, structure-property-function relationships, and translational visions of such technologies. Presentations focused on material considerations for microdevices for investigating hemostatic and thrombotic pathways are also of interest for this session.
 

Biomaterials-based strategies for endogenous tissue regeneration
Biomaterials-based strategies for endogenous tissue regeneration
Large tissue defects are still challenging to be effectively repaired by using current methods. Instead of relying on a large number of exogenous cells and/or proteins-based tissue engineering approaches, the strategies that using biomaterials to promote tissue regeneration by activating and harnessing endogenous reparative cells and signaling pathways are more promising and translational. Interesting endogenous signaling pathways that contribute to tissue regeneration include but not limited to angiogenesis, inflammation, stem cell recruitment, and differentiation, etc. This session will focus on introducing the emerging concepts and strategies in the development of innovative biomaterials/drug/gene delivery/stem cell techniques for challenged tissue regeneration, e.g., cartilage, bone, teeth, skin, muscle, etc.  Long term goal for this session is to develop new biomaterials-based regenerative treatments by using the body's innate ability through promoting the collaborations from the multidisciplinary filed.

Bio-metals assisted tissue regeneration
Bio-metals assisted tissue regeneration
Bio-metals are employed in various forms to substitute for damaged structural components and to restore lost functions within the human body for the purpose of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine. A favorable combination of tensile strength, fracture toughness and fatigue strength warrant their application in orthopedics, as artificial joints, plates and screws, in orthodontics and dentistry, as braces and dental implants, and as cardiovascular and neurosurgical devices, such as artificial heart, staples, stents, wires and coils. Compared to polymer and ceramic biomaterials, metals are characterized by higher electro-conductivity, and as such have been employed to enclose electrodes in artificial electronic organs. Lately, biodegradable metals emerged as a new generation of medical implants for regeneration. This symposium aims to highlight the latest developments of metals and their applications in tissue engineering/regenerative medicine.

Black Voices in Biomaterials Science and Engineering
Black Voices in Biomaterials Science and Engineering
This Symposium will highlight research conducted by Black biomaterial scientists while providing a space for attendees to learn about the experiences of Black scientists and engineers. It will include a guest lecture by an invited speaker, followed by a series of short talks selected amongst submitted abstracts. After the presentations, there will be a panel-style open Q&A and discussion, where attendees will be able to ask questions relevant to both the research and personal experiences of the speakers. 

Blood contacting materials in the treatment of COVID 19
Blood contacting materials in the treatment of COVID 19

Infection with the COVID-19 virus has resulted in clinical sequelae in virtually all of the body’s organ systems.  Two key strategies that have emerged to assist the most critically ill are ExtraCorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) and kidney dialysis.  These therapies require whole scale removal of blood from the patient and interaction with medical devices to enrich the blood with oxygen or remove waste products, respectively.  These procedures are extremely invasive and require lengthy contact times which can result in significant adverse effects.  This session investigates efforts to try to improve oxygenation and/or filtration technologies through the evolution of materials and/or treatment algorithms.

Bridging Gaps to Meet Dental and Craniofacial Clinical Needs
Bridging Gaps to Meet Dental and Craniofacial Clinical Needs
The tissues of the craniofacial complex and oral cavity contribute to numerous functions critical to life. A variety of clinical needs exist in maintaining the function and health of oral and craniofacial tissues. Biomaterials serve foundational roles in many current and emerging technologies to meet dental and craniofacial clinical needs, ranging from innovative materials for dental restorations to scaffold materials for craniofacial bone regeneration. This session will focus on biomaterial-based technologies and strategies to address clinical needs in dentistry and craniofacial medicine.

Cardiovascular Biomaterials
Cardiovascular Biomaterials SIG
The Cardiovascular Special Interest Group has the mission to foster the professional interaction and address the common concerns of academic and industrial scientists and engineers, clinicians, and regulatory professionals concerned with the discovery, research, development, and use of biomaterials for cardiovascular devices and implants.

Dental/Craniofacial Biomaterials
Dental/Craniofacial Biomaterials SIG
The Dental/Craniofacial Biomaterials Special Interest Group focuses on basic, applied, and clinical biomaterials research using approaches ranging from synthetic materials to biological mechanisms of therapy, and including materials/biological constructs and tissue structure-function analyses as biomimetic/design bases. Each of these approaches converge into the larger objective of restoring oral tissue structure and function. Issues related to materials used or having potential for use intra-orally or extra-orally for the restoration, fixation, replacement, or regeneration of hard and soft tissues in and about the oral cavity and craniofacial region are included. New dental biomaterials technologies include advanced inorganic and organic materials, biomimetics, smart materials, tissue engineering, drug delivery strategies and surface modified materials.

Drug Delivery
Drug Delivery SIG

The Drug Delivery Special Interest Group will deal with the science and technology of controlled release of active agents from delivery systems. Controlled drug release is achieved by the use of diffusion, chemical reactions, dissolutions or osmosis, used either singly or in combination. While the vast majority of such delivery devices are based on polymers, controlled release can also be achieved by the use of mechanical pumps. In a broader sense, controlled release also involves control over the site of action of the active agent, using the active agent using pro-drugs, targetable water soluble polymers or various microparticulate systems. Relevant aspects of toxicology, bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, and biocompatibility are also included.

Electronic Materials for Regenerative Engineering
Electronic Materials for Regenerative Engineering
Electrical stimulation (ES), using electrical cures (e.g. voltage, current, charge, electrical field etc.) has been shown to be extremely beneficial for promoting tissue regrowth. Regenerative-engineering approach can combine biomaterial scaffolds with external electrical-field or implanted electrical/electronic devices to induce and enhance tissue regeneration. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in the use of electrical/electronic/piezoelectric biomaterials that are safe/biocompatible (even biodegradable) and able to generate electrical charge/current/voltage to stimulate tissue growth while inherently serving as a tissue-scaffold to home stem cells and release growth-promoting factors. This symposium will cover the most updated science and the state of art technology in the use of novel electrical/electronic biomaterials in combination with the approach of regenerative engineering to heal diseased or damaged tissues and organs

Electronic materials for tissue regeneration
Electronic/electrical materials for tissue regeneration
Electrical stimulation (ES), using electrical cures (e.g. voltage, current, charge, electrical field etc.) has been shown to be extremely beneficial for promoting tissue regrowth. Regenerative-engineering approach can combine biomaterial scaffolds with external electrical-field or implanted electrical/electronic devices to induce and enhance tissue regeneration. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in the use of electrical/electronic/piezoelectric biomaterials that are safe/biocompatible (even biodegradable) and able to generate electrical charge/current/voltage to stimulate tissue growth while inherently serving as a tissue-scaffold to home stem cells and release growth-promoting factors. This symposium will cover the most updated science and the state of art technology in the use of novel electrical/electronic biomaterials in combination with the approach of regenerative engineering to heal diseased or damaged tissues and organs

Engineered biomaterials for neural applications
Engineered biomaterials for neural applications
Engineered biomaterials are uniquely positioned for use in creating, testing, and regenerating neural tissue with applications like in vitro models of injury and disease, therapeutic treatments, understanding neural development, and mapping the brain. This session will focus on cutting edge research in neural biomaterials including fundamental material development through pre-clinical studies.  These include big questions surrounding diseases and injuries of the peripheral and central nervous systems spanning neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and Schwann cells.

Engineering Biomaterials with Synthetic Biology
Engineering Biomaterials with Synthetic Biology
Recent advances in the field of synthetic biology have made it possible to engineer both living cells and assembled materials to perform a variety of cellular mimetic tasks. Increasingly, genetic tools are being used to design "living" materials that are responsive, communicate, make decisions, and produce useful molecules. This session will focus on developments to create "living" materials by interfacing synthetic biology and biomaterials. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: 1) developing and characterizing materials that display features of life or integrate living components, 2) designing materials that display information processing abilities including logic functions and decision-making capabilities, and 3) developing cells/materials that evolve and/or adapt to changing environments.

Engineering Cells and Their Microenvironments
Engineering Cells and Their Microenvironments SIG
This session will focus on research that describes biomaterials-based approaches for influencing cellular behaviors and fates, which include, for example, proliferation, differentiation, morphological state, motility, matrix production, and life/death. Advances in biomaterial technologies for engineering cells and their microenvironments play instrumental roles in discoveries ranging from elucidation of fundamental biological processes to translation of cellular and material systems to clinics and industry. Work in this area includes biomaterials and biomaterial systems that focus on controlling cells and their environments at the cell scale and talks will encompass engineering microenvironments, biomaterial-influenced cell signaling, technology used in stem cell manufacturing and differentiation, immunoengineering, and biomaterials for cell-based detection and diagnosis. Studies that will be highlighted will range from the development of biomimetic materials providing specific physicochemical cues that elicit desired phenotypic responses to work focused on applications of material systems at the cellular level, for example in cell-based and cell-focused therapies or in understanding the progression of disease, such as COVID-19. 

Engineering tissues with immune cells
Engineering tissues with immune cells

The combination of biomaterials and tissue engineering with cells of the immune system offers a powerful opportunity to create next-generation, immune-competent tissues.  This session will highlight recent advances at the intersection of tissue engineering and immune engineering. Abstracts are solicited in any of the following categories:
  * Immunomodulatory biomaterials for regenerative medicine, including wound healing and grafts
  * Materials that create in vivo immune niches, e.g. to modulate autoimmunity or cancer
  * Engineering of immune-competent in vitro tissue models, including organoids and organs-on-chip
  * Other means to leveraging tissue-immune cell interactions to enhance tissue engineering strategies

Glycomaterials
Glycomaterials
Carbohydrates, including monosaccharides, oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and their conjugates, are key structural and signaling elements in living systems. Understanding the roles of carbohydrates in nature has led to increasing opportunities to leverage them as both therapeutic targets and active components for biomedical and biotechnological applications. Materials fabricated from carbohydrates (i.e. "glycomaterials") are receiving increasing attention because they provide unique opportunities to recreate multivalent glycan architectures found on the surface of all cells and within the extracellular environment of multicellular organisms. This symposium will highlight recent advances in the synthesis, characterization, and use of glycomaterials. Particular emphasis will be placed on synthetic glycomaterials to engage the immune system, probe the function of the glycocalyx, and regulate glycan-binding protein activity.

Hemocompatibility: The blood material interface

Immunomodulatory Biomaterials
Immunomodulatory Biomaterials
The session will focus on engineered biomaterials for therapeutic immune modulation. Specifically, the session will cover topics ranging from biomaterials for delivery of immunomodulators and imaging agents, scaffolds for immunomodulation, cell‐based therapies, etc. Several cutting edge immune engineering platforms will be included.

Immune Engineering
Immune Engineering SIG
Over the past decade the focus of many bioengineers and clinicians has been shifting towards "immune engineering" approaches that include but are not limited to engineered biomaterials for vaccines, immunotherapy (immune-modulation), cell and gene therapy, immune microenvironment engineering, and systems immunology. These research areas embrace a comprehensive list of translational immunology-associated problems including chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, aggressive cancers, allergies, etc. The purpose of the Immune Engineering SIG is to bring together emerging ideas and provide a venue for professional interaction to a large number of academic and industrial research groups and scientists working in these areas.

Integrating 3D Cultures into Microfluidics and Organs-on-Chip
Integrating 3D Cultures into Microfluidics and Organs-on-Chip
This session will feature research at the burgeoning intersection of 3D culture technologies and microfluidics or organs-on-chip. Often, these fields operate separately, with 3D cultures or organoids in traditional well plates, or microfluidics containing 2D cultures. Integrating biomaterials-based 3D culture into microfluidic devices offers the potential for enhanced biological relevance.  This session will highlight recent advances in this area, including fabrication strategies as well as applications. Abstracts are solicited for research in or related to any of the following categories:

  * Use of microfluidics to control the environment around 3D cultures
  * Integration of organoids, spheroids, or hydrogel-based 3D cultures with microfluidic devices
  * Applications of microfluidic 3D cultures to model organ or tissue function

Latinx Voices in Biomaterials Science and Engineering
Latinx Voices in Biomaterials Science and Engineering
This Symposium will highlight research conducted by Latinx in biomaterials while providing a space for attendees to learn about the experiences of Latinx biomaterials scientists and engineers. It will include a guest lecture by an invited speaker, followed by a series of short talks selected amongst submitted abstracts. After the presentations, there will be a panel-style open Q&A and discussion, where attendees will be able to ask questions relevant to both the research and personal experiences of the speakers. 

Local Drug Delivery to Cardiovascular Targets
Local Drug Delivery to Cardiovascular Targets
The last decade has seen the introduction of competing technologies for treating arterial disease, with the greatest challenges and opportunities witnessed in both peripheral and coronary artery disease owing to the greater disease burden. This session will feature talks from academic researchers, clinicians and medical device researchers on biomaterial applications for local vascular drug delivery, covering non polymer coated stents, bioresorbable scaffolds and drug coated balloons.  The session aims at reflecting the multiple facets of this field and further fostering interactions with clinicians and industry.

Nanomaterials As Antiviral Therapies
Nanomaterials As Antiviral Therapies
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to advances in biomaterials as candidate therapies for this devastating disease. This Session will focus on the synthesis, characterization, and use of nanomaterials as potential antiviral therapies. 


Next generation biomaterials to resolve inflammation
Biomaterials have demonstrated promise to resolve inflammation in multiple disorders at both pre-clinical and clinical levels. In spite of the great progress, several gaps still exists and the field has been rapidly advancing to address those gaps and to dive into emerging challenges. This session intends to cover a broad range of the most exciting research topics related to biomaterials for resolving inflammation, and engage researchers across multiple sectors - including basic scientists, clinicians and industry experts, thereby highlighting the most critical gaps, our current status towards addressing those gaps and emerging focus areas. Topics would include, but not limited to next generation drug delivery platforms targeting inflammation, development of novel biomaterials to minimize inflammatory response in implants and cell/tissue transplants and functional biomaterials with intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties.


Next Generation Heart Valve Biomaterials
Bioprosthetic heart valves remain the design of choice for most clinical applications. After over fifty years of research, all bioprosthetic heart valves still rely on glutaraldehyde-crosslinked bovine pericardium as the leaflet biomaterial despite the durability remaining limited to 8-12 years, primarily due to structural degeneration and mineralization.  The next generation of synthetic heart valve materials must have sufficient durability, resistance to thrombosis, and excellent hemodynamics to surpass the in-vivo performance of pericardial biomaterials.

Nanomaterials
Nanomaterial SIG
The mission of the Nanomaterials SIG is to advocate for and organize the exchange of ideas involving the unique science and technology present in biomaterials at the nanoscale. By focusing on science, the SIG will champion the continual push to uncover new knowledge at the nanoscale and connect this to macroscale properties and behaviors of biomaterials. Through its focus on technology, the SIG will foster innovative design and synthesis of nanobiomaterials useful in the creation of new and better devices, diagnostics and therapeutics for biomedical applications. The SIG emphasizes an interdisciplinary vision to facilitate the translation of nanomaterials to achieve intended biological significance and medical impact. The vision is to establish the NanoSIG to become a thought leader in the nanobiomaterials research community by emphasizing nanoscience discovery, nanotechnology application, and clinical translation innovation.

Ophthalmic Biomaterials
Ophthalmic Biomaterials SIG
The Ophthalmology Special Interest Group focuses on both the development and biocompatibility testing of materials for the augmentation and replacement of diseased ocular tissues and the development and testing of drug delivery systems to the anterior and posterior segments of the eye. Some specific areas of interest include but are not limited to: wetting of surfaces; surface modification and protein adsorption of polymers used for refractive devices; transport through polymers, drug delivery systems and technologies; vitreous replacement fluids; retinal tamponades, and glaucoma drainage devices for the regulation of intraocular pressure.

Orthopaedic Biomaterials
Orthopaedic Biomaterials​
The Orthopaedic Biomaterials Special Interest Group is focusing on new technologies and materials advances in orthopaedic surgery. The three immediate goals of this emerging Special Interest Group are: 1) solicitation of new members for the Special Interest Group from current Society membership and from non-members actively engaged in research and development of improved materials for orthopaedics, 2) identification of key issues in orthopaedic materials that should be addressed within the Society, and 3) cooperation between Special Interest Group membership and the chairman of the Program Committee for the Annual Meeting to assist in the coordination of the scientific program.

Oxygen Imaging of Biomaterials with Emphasis on Islet Encapsulation Devices
Oxygen Imaging of Biomaterials with Emphasis on Islet Encapsulation Devices
The symposium will explore electron paramagnetic resonance oxygen imaging (EPROI) technique developed at the University of Chicago and marketed by O2M Technologies, LLC (www.o2map.com) and its application in tissue engineering regenerative medicine. We have possibility to bring scientists from EPROI as well as regenerative medicine as speakers in this session.

Pulmonary Biomaterials: in vitro models and new therapies
Pulmonary Biomaterials: in vitro models and new therapies
Now more than ever before respiratory diseases are impacting the daily lives of millions of people around the world. It is predicted that the acute damage caused by COVID-19 will manifest in an increase in chronic lung diseases worldwide.
This session will highlight strategies for harnessing biomaterials to develop new therapies for pulmonary conditions and build more physiological in vitro models of lung to capture key aspects of disease and regeneration not otherwise achievable in traditional preclinical models.

Resins, Minerals, and Metals for Dental Restoration
Resins, Minerals, and Metals for Dental Restoration
Modern dentistry and oral surgery are incorporating exciting new methods and tools to maintain oral health over a lifetime. Tooth restoration workflows may include digital imaging and intraoral scanning with high speed, resolution, and fidelity, enabling efficient production of high performance dental restorations and devices via digital milling or additive manufacturing. The goal of same-day, custom-fit restorations is becoming a reality, with in-office milling solutions and 3D printers, but all depend on advanced, predictable materials for meeting modern dental needs. This session welcomes contributions related to innovations in tooth and bone repair, and other extended-use, high modulus applications.

Sex-specific Bioengineered Technologies
Sex-specific Bioengineered Technologies

Sexual dimorphisms between men and women exist in both health and disease, yet our mechanistic knowledge of the sex-specific molecular and cellular mechanisms that guide sexual dimorphisms remain poorly characterized. In this session, we seek to highlight the latest research in biomaterials-based technologies that enable sex-specific understanding of biological mechanisms in health and disease. Topics in this session include (and are not limited to) using biomaterials as tools to design sex-specific cellular microenvironments, nanoparticle/drug delivery platforms, and engineered tissues. Incorporating sex as a biological variable in biomaterials research may enable the improved understanding of sexual dimorphisms in health and disease. 

Soft Tissue Regeneration in Dental/Craniofacial Applications
Soft Tissue Regeneration in Dental/Craniofacial Applications
How have advances in low-modulus materials, both synthetic and biologically-derived, changed or improved our ability to support soft tissues? This session will focus on engineered solutions to disease or trauma in dental/craniofacial tissues, including connective tissues, glands, oral mucosa, gingiva, and related structures. Advances in regenerative scaffold materials, across many levels of complexity, offer new avenues to restore function and preserve oral health.

Supramolecular Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery, Imaging, and Immunoengineering
Supramolecular Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery, Imaging, and Immunoengineering
Due to their versatility and diversity in materials properties, a wide range of biomedical applications have emerged in recent years using supramolecular nanomaterials. The bottom up approach to design functional objects at the nanoscale have been used to develop individual nanoparticles or to produce highly oriented materials for a growing number of applications including drug delivery, imaging, theranostics, vaccines, and immunotherapy. In addition, there are exciting opportunities for local therapeutic modulation.  This session highlights recent advances in nanomaterials designs aimed to enhance the in vivo delivery of therapeutic or imaging payloads for a variety of diseases including those affecting the skin, gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, cardiovascular system, cancer, and other diseased tissues. 

Surface Characterization & Modification
Surface Characterization & Modification SIG
The Surface Characterization and Modification Special Interest Group emphasizes two major research topics: 1) improving understanding of biomaterial surface structure and its relationship to biological performance, and 2) developing surface modification strategies for biomaterials. Some research areas that fall under these topics include spectroscopic, microscopic, and biochemical surface characterization, thin film deposition; chemical and ion surface modification; lubrication, passivation/corrosion, and biological films; and quality assurance of device surfaces. This Special Interest Group will be active in arranging workshops, symposia, and annual meeting sessions for the Society. Through these venues the Special Interest Group will provide a forum for exchange of ideas, methods, and expertise in surface characterization and modification.

Surface modification of biomaterials: Advances in technologies and fundamental knowledge
Surface modification of biomaterials: Advances in technologies and fundamental knowledge
In biomedical applications, the surface properties of biomaterials are critical. The surface of biomaterials determines the outcomes of biological-biomaterial interactions. Only certain surface properties can induce optimized cell interaction and adhesion thereby improving cell attachment and biocompatibility of the biomaterials. Various surface modification technologies have been developed and assessed to control the physicochemical interactions between biomaterials and the biological environment at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels. This symposium aims to highlight the recent advances and challenges in surface modification technologies and fundamental understandings of the biomaterials-tissue interaction in orthopedic and other areas. This symposium will cover topics related to advanced surface modification methods that are well established and those that are still in the early stage of development, and applications of such methods to optimize surface chemistry, morphology, and structures, and discuss how such modifications may lead to the development of promising biomaterials and successful medical devices.

Targeted and stimuli-responsive biomaterials for drug delivery
Targeted and stimuli-responsive biomaterials for drug delivery
Targeted and stimuli-responsive biomaterials, are promising for various applications in drug delivery. These "smart" materials can act rapidly at the site of interest while avoiding biological barriers, toxicity, and other potential detrimental effects. Many stimuli have been utilized to trigger stimuli-responsive materials including pH, temperature, ionic strength, chemical and/or mechanical microenvironment, redox potential, and light. Similarly, many targeting mechanisms ranging from passive (e.g., enhanced permeation and retention) to active targeting approaches (e.g., peptide ligands) have been integrated into targeted drug delivery systems. This session will focus on the development and use of such materials for applications including, but not limited to, cancer, infection, orthopedic diseases, cardiovascular disease, and autoimmune diseases.

Tissue Engineering
Tissue Engineering SIG
Tissue Engineering SIG is a forum to exchange information, further knowledge, and promote greater awareness regarding all aspects of the use of biomaterials to engineering tissue substitutes or to promote tissue regeneration. Of primary interest and relevance to TE SIG is the use of appropriate materials (synthetic and natural) with cells (either native or from a donor source) and/or biological response modifiers (e.g., growth factors, cytokines and other recombinant products) to replace tissue and organ functions. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of materials to better incorporate, protect, and deliver both the cells and biological response modifiers to help promote the healing and regenerative processes. The group is committed to forging interactions among basic scientists, applied scientists, engineers, clinicians, industrial members, professional societies in related fields, and regulatory groups in its efforts to expand and effectively utilize the shared knowledge base in this multidisciplinary field.

Translating Biomaterials Research: Accelerating Bench to Bedside
Translating Biomaterials Research: Accelerating Bench to Bedside *BTI*
Biomaterials may be applied for medical therapies, but bench to bedside translation is rare. This session will focus on successes and learnings from translational work in biomaterials research. Topics covered will include biomaterials-based device and drug delivery technologies that are going from bench top development and preclinical evaluation to evaluation in clinical trials. The journey from idea conception through the development process will be discussed, using specific examples with supporting data. Presenters will be encouraged to elaborate on topics including successes and lessons learned for their journey and advice on forming successful collaborations enabling translation.

Translational Applications of Cardiovascular Biomaterials for Tissue Regeneration: Joint Session with the American Heart Association
Translational Applications of Cardiovascular Biomaterials for Tissue Regeneration: Joint Session with the American Heart Association

This joint session with the American Heart Association will feature talks from both clinicians and bioengineers on the translational applications of biomaterials for tissue regeneration and tissue engineering.  

Translational immunomodulation in cancer and COVID-19: lessons learned
Translational immunomodulation in cancer and COVID-19: lessons learned
Big interest in cancer immunotherapy and cancer vaccine has prompted exciting translational material-based approaches that are reaching the clinic. Some of these lessons can be applied to treat COVID-19; the field of biomaterials immunoengineering is well positioned to contribute to the fight against the novel coronavirus and similarly devastating infections.  This session will solicit abstracts on technologies such as micro- and nanoparticles vaccines and therapies, as well as diagnostic and monitoring technologies, that have been developed in response to this public health emergency based on knowledge in the cancer and infectious disease domains. This session will highlight the role of material scientists, biologists and immunologists, in bringing new interdisciplinary solutions forward, leveraging shared biological pathways and approaches between these distinct diseases.

Translational organ-on-a-chip technology
Translational organ-on-a-chip technology
The adoption of microfluidics, lab-on-a-chip, organ-on-a-chip, and other advanced in vitro three-dimensional (3D) modeling techniques are increasingly used in studying normal functions, disease state and developing drugs and theranostics. In addition to advantages they may offer over conventional in vitro cell culture and animal experimentation, these technologies have their own specific properties and limitations. Many ‘on-a-chip’ approaches use the same biomaterials and microfabrication techniques, and some have advanced to commercialization, but there are still biomaterial and process-based risks which must be reasonably determined, addressed and reduced to an acceptable level. These emerging
technologies are noted in priority by FDA, evidenced by participation in the NIH Tissue Chip Consortium and through FDA publications and meetings over the past several years. There are notable examples of ‘on-a-chip’ products in different countries, and there has been early adoption in various research-level projects. The ultimate promise is the potential to use these technologies as an accepted drug testing modality, which when validated and standardized may largely
reduce the use of experimental animals and reduce problems associated with two-dimensional (2D) cell culture models. Adoption will be reflected by industrial advancement of biomedical products well beyond the current limits. This special panel comprises presentations and a discussion focused on various translational considerations of 3D on-a-chip devices, including (1) advancing technology out of the lab, and (2) commercialization of technologies into products for broad clinical use. This will include also discussion of standards, safety, regulatory and funding aspects.

Translational Orthopedic Biomaterials – Progress and Challenges
Translational Orthopedic Biomaterials – Progress and Challenges *BTI*
There are increasing demands for biomaterials that are responsive to local stimuli, and/or play multiple biological roles in a single application. The recent developments and breakthroughs of biomaterials with multiple biological functions and those that may contribute to COVID-9 treatments will be reported along with the challenges and translational studies. Progress in biomaterials like metals (including degradable materials), ceramics, and polymers for orthopedic applications will be highlighted. Technology and commercial challenges are also welcome to be presented. Mixed presentations from the U.S., Canada, Europe, and other countries are expected.